A not-for-profit foundation that connects the photo community and its audiences with the most inspiring work, the sharpest ideas, and with each other—in print, in person, and online.
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"I didn’t grow up to be a photographer, but I do work professionally in the fields of sculpture and studio furniture. I fondly look at Aperture as a formative object in my life—one that opened a window to the beautiful and strange world of images, and to large ideas."
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Is the story of photography coming to a close, or is it just beginning? 

From the Editor’s Letter in Aperture #213: Photography as you don’t know it
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Just released: Aperture Magazine #213, Winter 2013 
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Lisa Oppenheim. The Sun is Always Setting Somewhere Else, 2006. Looped slide projection of 15 slides, 35mm Kodak Ektagraphic Slide Projector, Variable dimensions
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Ram Under Plexiglas, Milltown, Montana
2012
Bryan Schutmaat

Available at Aperture 
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Aperture Foundation, in collaboration with the Department of Photography at Parsons the New School for Design, is pleased to present a talk with artist Lisa Oppenheim. Two of her recent projects involve photographic prints exposed using nontraditional light sources: for her series Smoke, Oppenheim solarized images of fire, explosions, and smoke with an open flame; for Lunagrams, she exposed contact prints of the moon to moonlight. The images for both series were often sourced from the public domain. In Smoke, the works’ titles include detailed descriptions and dates for the historical events from which the negatives are sourced. Lunagrams consists of new prints based on the work of John and Henry Draper, credited with creating the first telescopic photographs of the moon and other celestial bodies in the mid-nineteenth century. A portfolio of Oppenheim’s photographs was featured in Aperture magazine’s Summer 2013 issue with an introduction by Brian Sholis.
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Gus The Bear by Sylvia Plachy
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"I didn’t grow up to be a photographer, but I do work professionally in the fields of sculpture and studio furniture. I fondly look at Aperture as a formative object in my life—one that opened a window to the beautiful and strange world of images, and to large ideas."
Sculptor Christopher Kurtz on why Aperture matters. 
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Birds of the West Indies

Photographer: Taryn Simon Publisher: Hatje Cantz
Mutsuko Ota says of Taryn Simon’s latest book, “The work is as conceptually rigorous as others of her series, deftly balancing images and text. The printing, with highly spot-varnished images often featuring black backgrounds and printed on matte black pages, gives enhanced significance to the subjects depicted—aging ‘Bond Girls’ and 007 gadgets and secret weaponry. In terms of technique, the book is highly polished; and as an object, it carries quite an impact. If her previous book was very large, perhaps too large, this one seems just right.” The design of the cover and proportion of this volume directly reference the eponymous book written by the original James Bond, an ornithologist whose name Ian Fleming borrowed for his iconic series of books. With this work, Simon has deftly compiled a tongue-in-cheek taxonomy of James Bond’s cars, weapons, and women. The irreverent concept and deadpan execution combine to make Birds of the West Indies a memorable object.

Read more at Paris Photo and Aperture. 
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"If I like many photographers, and I do, I account for this by noting a quality they share – animation. They may or may not make a living by photography, but they are alive by it."
Robert Adams (via bheventspace)